For What It's Worth

I think you're cute

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Photo 1: “What appears to be part of a spring wedding bouquet is actually a nest for a rare species of solitary bee… Osmia avosetta.”

Photo 2: “O. tergestensis nests can be found in tight groups of five, as seen above. But the newly discovered nests of O. avosetta are usually found alone or with just one other nest”

Photographs by J.G. Rozen, AMNH

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/05/photogalleries/100510-bees-flower-sandwich-nests-pictures/#/bees-flower-nests-sandwich-purple_20050_600x450.jpg

Filed under solitary bees nest flowers national geographic american museum of natural history Jerome Rozen

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ohscience:

Lorises leave their babies alone while they gather food, so to keep them safe, they bathe them in saliva, which causes an allergic reaction in predators. One of the cooler defense mechanisms EVER
(Jurmain, Robert, Lynn Kilgore, and Wenda Trevathan. Introduction to Physical Anthropology. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth, 2008.)

Love learning little facts like this, plus lorises are just too cute

ohscience:

Lorises leave their babies alone while they gather food, so to keep them safe, they bathe them in saliva, which causes an allergic reaction in predators. One of the cooler defense mechanisms EVER

(Jurmain, Robert, Lynn Kilgore, and Wenda Trevathan. Introduction to Physical Anthropology. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth, 2008.)

Love learning little facts like this, plus lorises are just too cute

Filed under Loris young defense mechanism predation